Inspirational / Lifestyle / Over 50 / Retirement Planning

​​​​​​​Do You Still Want to Work? by Bill Storie

Bill Storie and Robin Trimingham are the co-founders of The Olderhood Group – an online retirement learning environment with over 70,000 global followers. In 2013 they launched a retirement planning blog which focuses on the issues related to the transition from the workplace to a... Read More

Do You Still Want to Work? by Bill Storie

I’m asked that question often now in my so-called retirement years.

The fact is that this Olderhood gig is a full-time job and commands attention around the clock and around the world. But I don’t classify this as a job. It is a vocation (I think that’s the word – I always got that mixed up with vacation).

So, leaving that to the side for a minute, would I like to be working again?

Not really. Although I have been doing a wee bit of new workshops with my former bank – the one I joined after I had stopped my consulting company. It’s a great place and really enjoy the people. I was in there today and bumped into six former colleagues. It gave me a warm feeling to be back behind the scenes, as opposed to be just in the banking hall.

So, I guess the camaraderie stuff is nice. But the desire to be part of the commuter grind and office politics and frustration stuff doesn’t appeal to me anymore. I’m fortunate that I don’t need the money, so that helps. I just can’t see how I could enjoy the working lifestyle again.

  • I can get up when I want to get up (although my 2 Yorkies ensure that 6.45 am is THEIR time, so up I get)
  • I can stay awake at night for as long as I like (although my eyes insist on closing down for the day around 10 pm)
  • I can watch YouTube videos at 11 am if I want (although movie-watching is actually not my thing.
  • I can do garden work at any time of the day (although in the warmer weather that proves to be more a wish than a task)
  • I can eat lunch at 10 am or 3 pm if I want (although old habits die hard, I still eat lunch at 12.30)
  • I can reply to emails whenever I choose rather than find the time between meetings (although I only respond to ones I like – which is another benefit of not having bosses, colleagues or idiots to contend with)
  • I can wear whatever I want if I am at home during the day (although I begrudgingly get dressed up for Olderhood meetings)
  • I can travel to town when I want and avoid the rush hour traffic (although on my little scooter/bike it’s a bumpy ride at any time of the day)

I could go on but that’s enough to convey the idea that this retirement gig is pretty good. I always wondered what I would do in retirement – which stimulated the idea for Olderhood. I must admit I never thought for a minute that I’d be blogging, Facebooking, book-writing, radio showing, video producing, public speaking, presenting workshops, etc. Although I have to say that the work we do in Olderhood seems to help lots of people in lots of places around the world and for that I am deeply humbled.

I am regularly asked if Olderhood is fun.

I always reply that it is satisfying.

So, I guess the answer to the original question,

“Do you still want to work?” is,

“Yup, that’s what I seem to be doing after all”.

By Bill Sorie